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Harnessing barcode-derived data in clinical workflows

Managing patient care requires a constant stream of data. It can be challenging to find the right information at the right time. In a fast-paced workflow, it’s almost impossible to keep track of all the details necessary to manage a patient. With so many software tools that rely on printed documents and manual entry, it’s no wonder so many healthcare organizations struggle with fragmented data and workflows. The need for smarter solutions is greater than ever before. In this blog post, we discuss how you can harness barcode-derived data in your clinical workflow. Read on to understand why this is important, discover examples of how other healthcare providers are using barcodes in their workflows, and learn about some of the ways you can leverage barcode-derived data in your organization.

Why is harnessing barcode-derived data in clinical workflows so important?

As we mentioned earlier, managing patient care requires a constant stream of data. This is especially true in the pharmaceutical and clinical research industries. The focus of these organizations is on quality and safety, and data integrity is absolutely critical. Each of these organizations might rely on thousands of pieces of paper to track critical information. They also might use paper-based forms to enter data that is essential for the workflow. While this might have been sufficient when these organizations were smaller, it is definitely not enough now. The need for smarter solutions is greater than ever before. Fortunately, there are viable options for implementing more efficient workflows. Barcode-derived data can be used to track items such as medications, specimens, or test results. This can help you manage your workflow and maintain data integrity.

Examples of how barcode-derived data can be used in a clinical workflow

There are a number of ways barcode-derived data can be used in a clinical workflow. Here are a few examples.

Track medication use

A medication administration chart is a standard part of any clinical workflow. With printed medication administration charts, you’re limited by the number of chart boxes and what can fit in those boxes. When you transition from printed charts to barcode-derived data, however, all of that changes. You can, for example, track medications and the patient’s allergies from a single barcode on each medication bottle. This will make it easier for nurses to administer medications and for physicians to review that data.

Track specimens

If you’re collecting specimens in a clinical workflow, you’re probably using a specimen container and a label. A printed label can summarize the details of the specimen and the patient to whom it belongs. Barcode-derived data can be used to track specimens, though. If you use barcode labels on specimens, you can scan those labels to see which specimens have been collected and which have not. You can also generate reports based on that data.

Track test results

Some clinical workflows involve collecting samples and analyzing them in a lab. If that’s the case for your organization, you’re probably using a paper-based system to track test results. Barcode-derived data can be used to track those results even if they’re printed on paper. You can also use barcode-derived data to track reagents.

How you can use barcode-derived data in your organization

As we’ve discussed, barcode-derived data can be used in a wide range of clinical workflows. You can use it to track medications, specimens, and test results. You can also use it to track items like equipment or supplies. In an ideal world, you’d use a single method to track all of these items. While that isn’t always possible, it can be the best way to manage your workflow. Barcode-derived data is very flexible. You can use it to track just about anything. You can also use it in a variety of ways in a variety of settings. The data from the barcode is usually integrated into the existing software application. This makes it easy for users to enter that data without being disruptive to the workflow.

Modular solutions like the ones offered by Zebra, market leader in scanning technology, make it possible to seamlessly switch between the various applications of barcodes in a medical setting

Conclusion

Barcode-derived data is an essential part of clinical workflows. It can be used to track medications, specimens, tests results, equipment, and supplies. This makes it easy to manage your workflow and maintain data integrity. There are several ways to use barcode-derived data in clinical workflows. You can use it on printed medication administration charts, specimen container labels, or test result printouts. You can also use it to track reagents or equipment. Barcode-derived data can be used by anyone regardless of their computer skills. It’s also very flexible, making it easy to implement in your clinical workflow.

Ventory's breakthrough cloud-based solution enables a suite of machine learning and AI-based functions and analytics to allow companies to digitize and automate their inventory using a combination of barcodes and other identifiers.

 

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